Pacifier recalled

A popular baby product company, Munchkins, recently issued a pacifier and pacifier clip recall. According to the company and to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)  the pacifiers pose a choking risk to youngsters. 

The recalled products were sold nationwide, both online and in big name stores like Target, Walmart, and Babies R Us, from March 2014-March 2016.

The CPSC issued the following description of the affected pacifiers:

The Center for Disease Control released a statement summarizing their investigation into the cause of the Chipotle Outbreak that sickened 60 people in 14 states was inconclusive. There were no deaths associated with the outbreak but 22 of the victims were hospitalized. 

Chipotle responded to the disastrous situation by implementing new safety protocols to reduce the chances of a similar occurrences in the future. 

FoodSafetyNews.com recently published an article highlighting the FDA’s inquiry into a peanut butter product manufactured by “STEEM,” a Greenfield, MA company.

You’ll fine many of the expected peanut butter ingredients in “STEEM” with an exception: green coffee extract. Each serving packs as much caffeine as up to two cups of coffee. 

If you reside in New York, Massachusetts, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire of New Jersey and shop at Whole Foods please take note! 

Whole Foods Curry Chicken Salad and Deli Chicken salad sold prepackaged, at salad bars, in sandwiches, and in chef’s cases have been recalled. The recall was issued due to potential Listeria Monocytogenes contamination. 

The U.S. Center for Disease Control Prevention (CDC) released its most recent summary of foodborne illness outbreaks in the United States. The reports found that 818 foodborne outbreaks were reported in the US in 2013, which is consistent with the 800-850 outbreaks reported in past years.

Each year, contaminated food sickens 48 million Americans. 28,000 of those are hospitalized, and 3,000 die as a result. The pathogen Salmonella is both common and potentially lethal. It infects more than a million Americans each year, sending 19,000 victims to the hospital, and killing more people than any other food-born pathogen.

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