Traumatic Brain Injury

In 2010 a neuropathologist  was commissioned by the Pentagon to research how the human brain is affected after being in the close proximity of an explosion. It is now more crucial than ever to develop a better understanding of the effects of brain injuries as a vast number of service members have been diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries in the last two decades. 

Through the month of March Brain injury awareness has been promoted, to help communities and individuals learn more about a tragic condition that effects so many. You may be surprised to find how often Brain injuries occur. The infographic below outlines how frequently healthy individuals become brain injury victims. 

March is the Brain Injury Association’s (BIAA) annual awareness month. Over the course of the month the BIAA encourages the general public to learn more about how brain injuries are caused and the everyday struggles that those who have suffered a brain injury endure. The current BIAA theme is “Not Alone.”

How common are brain injuries?

There has been a lot of talk about football and concussions in players, but new research suggests that brain changes can occur in high school football players when less severe head injuries occur.

The study found that repeated blows to the head after just one season could cause significant changes in the brain, even if there is no concussion.

The more often the players were struck, the more evidence they showed of brain changes that appeared abnormal.

As a society, we have become increasingly aware of the serious effects of repeated head injuries. Educating parents, coaches and school staff on preventing concussions is imperative. It is important to know how to recognize a concussion and the steps you as a parent, teacher or coach need to follow: Image provided by: Doctoroz.com
    The New York Times has published this article about the Obama administration’s latest undertaking to examine the workings of the human brain.  This could have significant implications in many areas, including gaining a better understanding of such diseases facing future generations like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.  Our Neuro

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